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Recent News

Recent News - stories from the last 14 days.

For information about a story, contact Ann Tihansky (202) 208-3342.

The 61st State Science and Engineering Fair of Florida STEM Competition March 29 - 31, 2016USGS scientists will judge at the 2016 Pinellas Regional Science & Engineering Fair

USGS scientists from the St. Petersburg Coastal & Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) Ilsa Kuffner (Research Marine Biologist) and Dale Griffin (Environmental and Public Health Microbiologist) will be judges at the 2016 Pinellas Regional Science & Engineering Fair held at the Seminole Middle School on Saturday, February 6th 2016, from 8am to 3pm. Over 200 projects in 13 categories and research areas are anticipated from public and private middle and high school students again this year. Twenty-four students will be chosen to represent the Pinellas Region at the 61st Florida State Science and Engineering Fair in Lakeland. The students' interactions with professional scientists will provide valuable experiences for their individual growth in academic studies, as well as assisting them in future career decisions.

posted: 2016-02-03



USGS scientists attend AGU's Ocean Sciences meeting in New Orleans, Lousiana

The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is holding its annual Ocean Sciences meeting in New Orleans, Lousiana, at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, 21–26 February 2016. Cosponsored by AGU, the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, and The Oceanography Society, the Ocean Sciences Meeting will consist of a diverse program covering topics in all areas of the ocean sciences discipline. The USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) will be represented at this meeting by 9 researchers. Research spans a range of topics including coastal sedimentary systems, remote sensing, and numerical modeling.

Name Session Title
Bernier, J. MG44B: Response of Coastal Sedimentary Systems to Anthropogenic Alterations and Climate Change II Posters Morphological controls on barrier-island response and recovery following natural and anthropogenic perturbations, northern Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana
Brown, J. EC14C: Nearshore Processes IV Posters Extracting Maximum Total Water Levels from Video "Brightest" Images
Dalyander, P. MG14A: Sediment Dynamics in Coastal Settings: Observations and Modeling of Sediment Transport, Morphology, and Change on Event to Decadal Timescale Parameterization of Beach and Dune Recovery to Inform Decadal Scale Prediction of Barrier Island Evolution
Long, J. MG21A-03: Sediment Dynamics in Coastal Settings: Observations and Modeling of Sediment Transport, Morphology, and Change on Event to Decadal Timescales III Combining remotely sensed data and numerical modeling to investigate the impacts of vegetation on barrier island erosion
Miselis, J. MG41A: Response of Coastal Sedimentary Systems to Anthropogenic Alterations and Climate Change I Toward Quantifying Shoreface Contributions to Littoral Sediment Budgets
Nelson, T. MG21A: Sediment Dynamics in Coastal Settings: Observations and Modeling of Sediment Transport, Morphology, and Change on Event to Decadal Timescales III Barrier Island Breaching in Response to Extreme Storms: Morphodynamic Evolution of the Fire Island Wilderness Breach
Torres-Garcia, L. EC24C: Observations and Modeling of Physical Processes along Coral Reef-Lined Coasts II Posters Evaluation and Application of Wave and Ocean Circulation Models to Understand Coral Reef Processes
Wilson, K. MG14A: Sediment Dynamics in Coastal Settings: Observations and Modeling of Sediment Transport, Morphology, and Change on Event to Decadal Timescales II Development of a Probabilistic Decision-Support Model to Forecast Coastal Resilience
Zawada, D. EC23A-03: Observations and Modeling of Physical Processes along Coral Reef-Lined Coasts I An Integrated Study of the Degadation of a Reefscape in the Florida Keys

posted: 2016-02-03



USGS oceanographer has new research article in the Journal of Geophysical Research

Joe Long (SPCMSC oceanographer) has a newly published research article in the Journal of Geophysical Research—Oceans which investigates the spatial and temporal scales of nearshore hydrodynamics in a region strongly influenced by offshore submarine canyons. The new study modeled hydrodynamics along a particular section of the coast for 4 consecutive weeks, and highlights the role that wave direction and nonlinear processes play in dictating nearshore rip currents in this complex coastal environment. The full publication can be accessed here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015JC010990/full (DOI: 10.1002/2015JC010990).

posted: 2016-02-03



USGS Researchers meet with Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority

On February 3, 2016, USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) researchers will meet with the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) in Thibodaux, Louisiana. SPCMSC scientists Jack Kindinger (Geologist), Jim Flocks (Research Geologist), and Stan Locker (Research Geologist) will join CPRA Project Managers and Senior Administrative Officials to discuss Louisiana's Barrier Island Comprehensive Monitoring Program. Since 2005, the USGS has provided scientific guidance, as well as assistance in developing and implementing the BICM Program. This discussion will address continuing projects that were implemented in 2015; and will plan the multi-year program (2015–2019), which is under the leadership of the USGS. For more information visit http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/geo-evo/research/bicm.html.

posted: 2016-02-03



3-D perspective view of shaded relief bathymetry offshore Chenega village. Shaded patches of seafloor depict areas that experienced dramatic changes in water depth between 1957 and 2014.From the USGS Newsroom: 50-Year-Old Mystery Solved: Seafloor Mapping Reveals Cause of 1964 Tsunami that Destroyed Alaskan Village

Minutes after the 1964 magnitude-9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake began shaking, a series of tsunami waves swept through the village of Chenega in Prince William Sound, destroying all but two of the buildings and killing 23 of the 75 inhabitants. Fifty years later, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey revealed the likely cause of the tsunami, a large set of underwater landslides. The scientists used detailed seafloor images not only clear up a decades-old mystery, but also underscore the tsunami hazard that submarine landslides can pose in fjords around the world where communities and ports are commonly located.

Read the entire News Release from February 1, 2016.

posted: 2016-02-02



Photograph of USGS research vessel Parke Snavely and USGS scientist operating a personal watercraft equipped with echosounders.Elwha River mouth survey to document changes after dam removal

Scientists from the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center plan to survey the mouth, beach, and nearby seafloor of the Elwha River in Washington, February 15-19, 2016. The survey will continue to document changes triggered by the 2011-2014 removal of two large dams upstream. Scientists on the research vessel Parke Snavely will map the seafloor using swath sonar. Others, on smaller vessels, will map close to shore and about 1 kilometer up the river using echosounders. Scientists onshore will survey the beach using backpack GPS receivers. A crew on the research vessel Frontier will collect sediment samples to measure grain-size. Similar surveys, conducted regularly since 2004, recorded major changes to the area.

For more information, contact Jon Warrick, jwarrick@usgs.gov, 831-460-7569, or Andrew Stevens, astevens@usgs.gov, 831-460-7424.

Visit the web page on USGS Science to Support the Elwha River Restoration Project.

posted: 2016-02-01



Photo of beach at Fire Island, NYUSGS Researchers collect surveys before and after the January 2016 Nor'easter on Fire Island

From January 20–27, Owen Brenner and Kat Wilson, research staff from the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, are conducting GPS monitoring surveys on Fire Island, New York, as part of the continuing efforts to assess post-Sandy beach recovery. In an extended field effort, the team has been able to collect surveys both immediately prior to and following the January 2016 Nor'easter, capturing storm impacts in the largest storm to make landfall at Fire Island since Hurricane Sandy. The work is part of Hurricane Sandy Supplemental project GS2-2B. Surveys of shorelines and beach profiles were first collected just before Hurricane Sandy, and have been collected frequently in the three years since. The data produced from the surveys will also provide important baseline monitoring for the planned beach nourishment projects at Fire Island.

For more information on the Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Fire Island project, visit: http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/fire-island/ or contact Owen Brenner, obrenner@usgs.gov.

posted: 2016-01-28



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